CONCEPT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

The Concept of Sustainable Development derives from a scientific and social-ideological study of the systemic civilization crisis and the world’s problems. The progressive part of the world’s scholarly community and political elites had recognized their existence by the end of the 20th century. They looked at the coming 21st century as an era of uncertainty and escalating global catastrophic processes.

The term was first used in the UN Program for Global Change to identify humanity’s development trajectories, which was adopted by the UN International Commission headed by former Norwegian Prime-Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland. It was used in the 1987 report "Our Common Future". The phrase sustainable development was used to denote the key idea reflecting the meaning and values of the global anti-crisis movement. The phrase sustainable development was used to denote the key idea reflecting the meaning and values of the global anti-crisis movement.

The institutionalisation of the sustainable development category took place at the United Nations Conference on Environment and Development (UNCED) in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. It was there that the Concept of Sustainable Development was made the foundation of anti-crisis environmental modelling.

The notion of sustainable development was first tied to the sphere of the relationship between man, society and nature. Sustainable development implies: normative-legal and other mechanisms of restraining human economic intervention in nature; other side effects of globalization based on scientific assessment and forecasts; and some other principles approved by global international institutions (e.g., the UN).